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Black Marble

Hand-Tossed Pizza

"This easy pizza dough recipe is great for beginners and produces a soft homemade pizza crust. Skip the pizza delivery because you only need 6 basic ingredients to begin!"



Every great pizza begins with a great pizza crust. Some like it thin and crispy, while others prefer a thick and soft crust. This homemade pizza crust has it all: soft & chewy with a delicious crisp and AWESOME flavor. It’s my go-to pizza dough recipe.


Hand-Tossed Pizza

Servings – 2 - 12" Pizzas = 16 Slices Prep Time – 2 Hours and 15 Minutes Cook Time – 15 Minutes

Ingredients:


Dough


  • 1 and 1/3 cups warm water, between 100-110°

  • 2 and 1/4 teaspoons instant yeast, 1 packet

  • 1 Tablespoon granulated sugar

  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil, plus more for pan and brushing on dough

  • 1 teaspoon salt

  • 3 and 1/2 cups all-purpose flour spooned & leveled, plus more for hands and surface

  • sprinkle of cornmeal for dusting the pan


Toppings


I suggest pepperoni, green peppers, jalapeño slices, extra cheese pizzapineapple, ham slices, sausage crumbles, olives, pesto, marinara sauce, mushrooms, Alfredo sauce, spinach, artichokes, or BBQ sauce and grilled chicken slices.


Directions:


Whisk the warm water, yeast, and granulated sugar together in the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with a dough hook or paddle attachment. Cover and allow to rest for 5 minutes. *If you don’t have a stand mixer, simply use a large mixing bowl and mix the dough with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula in the next step.


Add the olive oil, salt, and flour. Beat on low speed for 2 minutes.


Knead the dough: 


Keep the dough in the mixer and beat for an additional 5 full minutes, or knead by hand on a lightly floured surface for 5 full minutes. If the dough becomes too sticky during the kneading process, sprinkle 1 teaspoon of flour at a time on the dough or on the work surface/in the bowl to make a soft, slightly tacky dough. Do not add more flour than you need because you do not want a dry dough.


After kneading, the dough should still feel a little soft. Poke it with your finger—if it slowly bounces back, your dough is ready to rise. You can also do a “windowpane test” to see if your dough has been kneaded long enough: tear off a small (roughly golfball-size) piece of dough and gently stretch it out until it’s thin enough for light to pass through it. Hold it up to a window or light. Does light pass through the stretched dough without the dough tearing first? If so, your dough has been kneaded long enough and is ready to rise. If not, keep kneading until it passes the windowpane test.


Rise:


Lightly grease a large bowl with oil or nonstick spray—just use the same bowl you used for the dough. Place the dough in the bowl, turning it to coat all sides in the oil. Cover the bowl with aluminum foil, plastic wrap, or a clean kitchen towel. Allow the dough to rise at room temperature for 60-90 minutes or until double in size. Tip: For the warm environment on a particularly cold day, heat your oven to 150°. Turn the oven off, place the dough inside, and keep the door slightly ajar. This will be a warm environment for your dough to rise. After about 30 minutes, close the oven door to trap the air inside with the rising dough. When it’s doubled in size, remove from the oven.


Preheat oven to 475°. Allow it to heat for at least 15-20 minutes as you shape the pizza. If using a pizza stone, place it in the oven to preheat as well. Lightly grease baking sheet or pizza pan with nonstick spray or olive oil. Sprinkle lightly with cornmeal, which gives the crust extra crunch and flavor.


Shape the dough:


When the dough is ready, punch it down to release any air bubbles. Divide the dough in half. If not making 2 pizzas, freeze half of the dough for another time. See freezing instructions below.


On a lightly floured work surface using lightly floured hands or rolling pin, gently flatten the dough into a disc. Place on prepared pan and, using lightly floured hands, stretch and flatten the disc into a 12-inch circle, about 1/2-inch thick. If the dough keeps shrinking back as you try to stretch it, stop what you’re doing, cover it lightly for 5-10 minutes, then try again. Once shaped into a 12-inch circle, lift the edge of the dough up to create a lip around the edges. I simply pinch the edges up to create the rim. If using a pizza stone, place the dough directly on baker’s peels dusted with cornmeal.


Cover dough lightly with plastic wrap or a clean kitchen towel and allow to rest for a few minutes as you prepare your chosen pizza toppings.


Top & bake the pizza:


Using your fingers, push dents into the surface of the dough to prevent bubbling. To prevent the filling from making your pizza crust soggy, brush the top lightly with olive oil. Top with your favorite toppings and bake for 13-15 minutes or until the crust is golden brown.


Slice hot pizza and serve immediately!


Cover leftover pizza tightly and store in the refrigerator. Reheat as you prefer. Baked pizza slices can be frozen up to 3 months.


Freezing Instructions:


This recipe yields enough dough for two 12-inch pizzas, a little less than 2 pounds total. After the pizza dough rises and you divide the dough in half, you can freeze one of the balls of dough to make pizza at a later time. Or you can simply freeze both balls of dough separately. Lightly coat all sides of the dough ball(s) with nonstick spray or olive oil. Place the dough ball(s) into individual zipped-top bag(s) and seal tightly, squeezing out all the air. Freeze for up to 3 months. To thaw, place the frozen pizza dough in the refrigerator for about 8 hours or overnight. When ready to make pizza, remove the dough from the refrigerator and allow to rest for 1 hour on the counter.


Pictured Pizza: 


This recipe yields 2 pizzas. For each, top with 1/2 cup pizza sauce, 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese, pepperoni slices, and a sprinkle of Italian seasoning blend.



"This recipe is a keeper. Great to make ahead and keep in the freezer for when you are craving a hot cheesey delicious pizza at home."


CWT is not a certified dietician or nutritionist. Any nutritional information shared on this site is an estimate counted through measurements and package nutritional information used in each recipe. If calorie, macro counting and other nutritional values are important to you, I recommend running the ingredients through your choice of nutritional calculator you prefer. Calories can vary depending on national brands used per recipe.

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